Doctrine of Discovery

An educational resource and study group maintained by the Indigenous Values Initiative and the American Indian Law Alliance.

Posts - Page 2 of 7

Haudenosaunee Host Doctrine Of Discovery Gathering

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“I think it’s something that people don’t really understand,” observes Betty Lyons, President and Director of the American Indian Law Alliance. “They go about their daily lives and they do things and they don’t understand why they’re doing them and how much the Doctrine has affected everyone everywhere.” … “Really what we’re doing is bringing together people who did not get along in the recent past,” comments Phil Arnold. “What we’re trying to do is get Christian groups and other religious groups to put into the restoration and healing of Indigenous peoples, as much energy into that as they have in the past into their destruction. The idea was that they were a primitive and inferior group of people. They were hindering civilization and progress and so they were understood to be in the way.”

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Rns Article About The Conference

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The way Steven T. Newcomb describes the Doctrine of Discovery these days is “a claim of a right of Christian domination.” It was first expressed by Pope Nicholas V in the 1452 papal bull “Dum Diversas,” which — along with subsequent bulls “Romanus Pontifex” and “Inter Caetera” — created a theological justification for Christian rulers seizing the property and possessions of non-Christians.

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The Doctrine Of Discovery Unmasking The Domination Code

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The Doctrine of Discovery, Unmasking The Domination Code by 38 plus 2 productions and Steven T. Newcomb. The film cost $21.50 USD. To order the film send a check or money order to: 38 Plus 2 Productions 40163 Reservation Hwy 3, Morton MN, 56270

  • If interested in bulk rate or having producers conduct a public showing please contact Steven Newcomb
  • About The Doctrine of Discovery, Unmasking the Domination Code:  

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The Biblical Basis Of Federal Indian Law Policy

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As bizarre as it may seem, today’s federal definitions of Indian title and Indian nationhood find their basis in the Old Testament covenant tradition. This tradition is premised on the idea of a “chosen people” who have a covenant (treaty) with their deity to take over and colonize certain lands that the deity promised them, in this case Indian lands.

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Resources By Peter Derrico

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“Replacing the Doctrine of Christian Discovery and Implementing the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.”

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Sherrill V Oneida Opinion Of The Court

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Under the “doctrine of discovery,” County of Oneida v. Oneida Indian Nation of N. Y., 470 U.S. 226, 234 (1985) (Oneida II), “fee title to the lands occupied by Indians when the colonists arrived became vested in the sovereign–first the discovering European nation and later the original States and the United States,” Oneida Indian Nation of N. Y. v. County of Oneida, 414 U.S. 661, 667 (1974) (Oneida I). In the original 13 States, “fee title to Indian lands,” or “the pre-emptive right to purchase from the Indians, was in the State.” Id., at 670; see Oneida Indian Nation of N. Y. v. New York, 860 F.2d 1145, 1159—1167 (CA2 1988). Both before and after the adoption of the Constitution, New York State acquired vast tracts of land from Indian tribes through treaties it independently negotiated, without National Government participation. See Gunther, Governmental Power and New York Indian Lands–A Reassessment of a Persistent Problem of Federal-State Relations, 8 Buffalo L. Rev. 1, 4—6 (1959) (hereinafter Gunther).

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